8 Weeks post Pin Pull

Things you should know about me.

I often say I’ll do something but then can’t be bothered.

Often when I can be bothered, I’ll start the task and then get bored or distracted midway and will stop. Never to return to it again.

This has been the recurring theme of my 30 and a half years on this earth.

People, activities, jobs…I have a short attention span.

Tomorrow makes it eight weeks since I had my pins pulled and I am yet to get around to writing about the experience. I don’t have any kind of excuse other than chronic laziness. Also, where has the time gone? I always thought old people were joking when they said life goes quicker when you’re older but turns out, the joke is on me. Because it’s practically Christmas. And yet I’m no closer to retirement.

How was the pin pull?

Surprisingly, absolutely fine.

Yes, it did involve my consultant using an actual pair of pliars to pull them, but honestly a quick pain free tug and they were out. A tad uncomfortable, but not painful. A fair bit of blood and two little holes in the top of my toes but that was it. I recall it felt a bit like somebody pressing down on a bruise and them pressure being released. Like my toes were champagne bottles or something. I try to avoid looking at things like this (thankfully, being very short sighted, all I have to do is remove my glasses), but my overriding memory of it though was that the pins were both a lot longer and thicker than I expected (something a gal so seldom complains about).

Pre-pin pull however I had removed all of my bandages and dressings because frankly I was so fed up it was literally making me cry. Hot, itchy and uncomfortable so on New Years Eve I cut them off to give me some relief. Talking to others it seems that a lot of people have their bandages removed a the two week check up. Not me, I have more added on. I was worried I’d be told off, that I should have kept them on but thankfully this wasn’t the case.

Never one to miss an opportunity to try and make people laugh (usually at my own expense), I struck up a conversation with the nurse about how I’m not usually very good at hospital situations (I once fainted and hit the floor very hard watching my Mum recovering after having given blood…I wasn’t even four years old. I’ve always been dramatic, but I did get a free tub of biscuits from the kind nurses to make me feel better, so maybe I’ve just subconsciously been bad at these things in a bid to get biscuits. Hobnobs please), and the next thing I knew she presented me with a certificate with my name on and stickers celebrating how brave I was. JP was mortified. I however told the lovely nurse that the certificate would take pride of place on my bookcase, and it has.

My consultant has referred me for foot two and I’m hopeful I’ll be seen sometime this year.

I ended up taking an extra 2 weeks off work because I overestimated how quickly I’d get back to normal. I was still very scared to walk with my toes on my floor for the first few weeks, I just automatically stuck to walking on the heel. But with time and practice, I started to straighten the foot out a bit more and now I’m back to walking normally with no limp.

I kept the foot dry to allow the little holes to heal and took my first, two footed bath a day later AND IT WAS GLORIOUS.

My activity levels still aren’t what they were before. Not least because my fatigue is still pretty bad. But I’m trying to do a bit more walking each week and hope I’ll be back to running in a few months time.

I returned to work part time, 50% hours for a fortnight and then 75% for another. Important lesson I have learnt – working 5 days in a row is not the one. With hindsight (and for the next foot), I’ll ask to work maybe 3 days a week and work my way up. I got very sick midway through my second week and had to take time off work, and I then ended up extending my part time hours because I don’t feel….right. The word fibromyalgia has reared it’s ugly head again but I’m not sure. Tired, poorly, achy, the usual.

I restarted my cosentyx injections in January (and wisely switched from a Monday to a Friday, thus making work on a Tuesday a less awkward experience for me….we’re talking unpleasant side effects. If you know, you know) but so far don’t feel like they’re working at their optimum level like they were before. I have the smallest two patches of psoriasis, which isn’t a problem and doesn’t bother me, but they exist, when they shouldn’t. Fatigue is still pretty high, but that could also be because of being off my feet for almost 3 months. I’ll be taking my third injection of 2019 in a couple weeks time and if by April I still don’t feel like I’m back to 100% then it’s time to phone my rheumy nurse.

The foot however is doing well, still bruised and puffy but getting slightly less sore with each passing week. I haven’t yet had the chance to try a ‘normal’ shoe on it because it’s still too swollen but early indications are that the op has done its job. The new toes do take a bit of getting used to though. They hit the floor every so slightly before the rest of the toes (we won’t even be talking a nanosecond, but see previous comment. I’m very dramatic) and it is a bit freaky to start with. Getting in to the shower really scared me. It felt like my toes had been inflated. The new toes were just….YUCK. Having said that, I’m almost used to it now.

Something else you don’t think about is how you get shoes on your feet. Normal feet, the toes bend and move to slip in to the shoe all by themselves. You don’t even have to think about it. Everything just does what it needs to do by itself. New toes minus the joint do not bend, and thus, you have to kind of shove them in. Again, once you’ve done it a few times it just comes naturally.

Otherwise, it’s all good. I’m just home from a long weekend in Newcastle. My foot didn’t fall off during all the hundreds of miles of driving and bar being a bit sore when changing gear, I survived. Home for a fortnight before jumping on a plane for my first proper holiday of the year (and so far, my only one planned. Must change this. I have just over 8 weeks holiday from work this year) and back to studying for my second year of Open University, which is taking up a lot of time which could otherwise be spent reading.

Any ideas on how to make driving more comfortable? How to differentiate between arthritic pain and non-arthritic pain? How to keep myself more motivated blogging?

Send all idea and tip and tricks for how to do the above, and generally survive life, my way!

How to (unofficially) survive a sinus infection

How to (unofficially) survive a sinus infection

If you follow me on Instagram then you’ll probably have seen that I have a severe sinus infection.

It first occurred just after I started my cosentyx, and a quick read of the side effects shows you that sinusitis is pretty high up the list of things. Why are side effects never things like beautiful glowing skin or impossibly soft and shiny hair?

I’ve had sinusitis for over six months now. It has been unrelenting. Every time I think it’s getting better, it attacks me again with a vengeance.

I first saw a GP about it a few days after Christmas. As soon as I uttered the words “I’m on cosentyx” the tone of the appointment change. A quick check of cosentyx in the medical version of google and I’m told it’s a side effect. Get on with it. Just one of these things I’ll have to put up with. Trying to explain to her that I have been getting on with it but I’m here because I can take no more. Only to leave with no advice, no sympathy, nothing.

I continued to just get on with it as best I could.

But barely a day went by when I didn’t feel the symptoms. Painful forehead. Painful cheeks. Blocked nose. Headache. Earache. Sore throat. Sniffly. Runny nose. Sore nose. I knew it wasn’t a cold because even when auto immune supressed like I am, colds do get better. This wasn’t ever getting better. It was only getting worse.

2 days ago I was enjoying a nice weekend at home with my boyfriend, spending some time on the sofa slobbing out watching the World Cup. Out of nowhere, and I mean out of nowhere, I became so run down. All of the symptoms I listed above came on in seconds. I knew at this point I had to go back to my doctor and was lucky enough yesterday to get a same day appointment.

Being the pessimist that I am, I was expecting the doctor to fob me off like I have been all of the other times. How wrong I was. A quick inspection confirmed that I have been suffering with a severe sinus infection that I shouldn’t expect to clear for about 6 weeks. I returned to work after the appointment but the symptoms got the better of me and I headed home to rest, which is where I still am now. Feeling that usual guilt of wondering what colleagues think of me being off again, trying to rationalise it all with the knowledge that I am unwell and that I really do need the rest.

I woke up this morning with the worst skin and dry chapped lips due to the constant blowing of my nose. I described myself to a friend earlier as both feeling and looking like ‘day old bread’. Can’t wait to get better and feel better and look better. It doesn’t just happen by itself however.

So. I’ve decided to share with you my personal guide to dealing with a sinus infection.

Let’s get steaming

  • Great for both trying to breathe again and for sorting out horrible lizard skin. I use a toner tab from Lush and a few drops of eucalyptus oil. Add to a bowl, mix with a kettle full of water that has been boiled and voila. Don’t stick your head to close to the water, giving yourself a steam burn at this point really would be the worst. Head over bowl, towel over head, and breathhhhhe. I steam my face for about 20 mins and follow with a good moisturiser. Hot baths are also great. I’ve had 2 so far today and will have one shortly before I go to bed. Again, I add a few drops of the eucalyptus oil to the bath.
  • Nasal sprays are a godsend. You will fall in love with one. And as tempting as it is to stick it up your nose 100 times a day every day for as long as you live, this is not recommended. Don’t use one for more than a week. This is definitely a case of something where I should practice what I preach. It’s not my fault it feels so damn good! Sterimar is a great nasal spray and I know a lot of fellow PsA sufferers swear by the stuff.

 

Softly Softly

  • I love love love using Eucerin Replenishing Face Cream with 5% urea. This one is the ‘night’ formula which is a lot thicker than the day cream. A little goes a long way. It can leave skin greasy after it’s been applied but this is a small price to pay. (Side note, all Eucerin products with urea in worked wonders for my psoriasis so give it a go)
  • Egyptian Magic Cream. Sure, on the surface, it’s just a tub of very expensive Vaseline. But this is a life saver. I apply to the skin that’s been abused by nose blowing and to sore lips.
  • When everything starts to get better and skin is less sore, Origins Never a Dull Moment exfoliator gets you back to beautiful glowing skin. Plus it’s microbead free so seals and turtles benefit too.

General Points for Survival

  • See a doctor. I was prescribed antibiotics and a strong nasal spray. If you’re on a biologic like I am, check with your doctor if you can take antibiotics. I did not check this. I took my first two antibiotics yesterday, and then that evening took my monthly cosentyx shot as planned. With hindsight, probably not something I should have done. I’m taking antibiotics to fight infection before immediately injecting a drug that heavily reduces my bodies ability to, well, fight infection. Not my finest moment. Hoping that the antibiotics will still do the job BUT YOU MUST CHECK WITH YOUR GP.
  • Lots of rest. Recovery is quicker if you have a cat to keep you company and provide limitless cuddles. Dogs work just as well. My rest right now involves me in my dressing gown, laid out on my sofa, propped up by memory foam cushions and under a comfy blanket. World Cup on TV, cup of tea to hand, endless supply of chocolate buttons.
  • Painkillers. If you need ‘em, take ‘em. Right now my painkiller of choice is co-codamol. My sinus pain is most severe in my forehead and when it flares I want to bash my head against a wall. The co-codamol does a good job at relieving this. I hate people who claim that painkillers are bad. Who preach for you to not take painkillers. These are the same people who claim that things like biologics are poison and natural is best blah blah blah. If you need painkillers, you take them. Don’t listen to fake martyrs. I hate these people. I love tramadol. Life goes on.
  • Lots of water. I am powered by rooibos tea.

 

A bit like florals for spring, I’m sure my survival guide is literally ground breaking. The abused skin around my nose is already getting softer so by the time I intend to face the outside world I hope to be looking fresh and healthy.

If you’ve any advice and tips for how you survive sinusitis and other ailments, then please let me know. I doubt this will be my last bout!

 

Products

Toner Tabs https://uk.lush.com/products/spot-treatment/tea-tree

Eucalyptus Oil https://www.boots.com/botanics-aromatherapy-pure-essential-eucalyptus-oil-10ml-10031672

Eucerin Facial Moisturiser https://www.boots.com/eucerin/eucerin-top-10-favourites/eucerin-dry-skin-replenishing-face-cream-night-urea-with-lactate-50ml-10065361

Egyptian Magic Cream https://www.feelunique.com/p/Egyptian-Magic-All-Purpose-Skin-Cream-118ml?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInuGczLfg2wIVFrcbCh30uwYlEAAYASAAEgLrRPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

Origins Scrub https://www.origins.co.uk/product/15343/11869/skincare/cleanse/exfoliator/never-a-dull-moment/skin-brightening-face-polisher-with-fruit-extracts

Sterimar Nasal Spray https://www.boots.com/sterimar-stop-and-protect-cold-and-sinus-relief-20ml-10191795